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Plan Contents

Executive Summary

Introduction

Chapter 1
Bikeway Network

Chapter 2
Bicycle-friendly Streets

Chapter 3
Bike Parking

Chapter 4
Transit

Chapter 5
Education

Chapter 6
Marketing and
Health Promotion

Chapter 7
Law Enforcement
and Crash Analysis

Chapter 8
Bicycle Messengers

Conclusion

Credits

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MBAC

Chapter 7

Objective Three:
Focus enforcement efforts on traffic violations that pose the greatest threats to bicyclist safety.

Strategies

3.1 Publicize and enforce the ordinance prohibiting the parking of motor vehicles in bike lanes. Motor vehicles parked in bike lanes force bicyclists to merge into faster moving traffic unexpectedly, risking accidents and discouraging bike lane use. To encourage voluntary compliance, widely publicize the Department of Revenue’s efforts to enforce the ordinance and post “No Parking in Bike Lane” signs at problematic locations. Continue having an intern enforce the bike lane ordinance between May and October, when there is more bicycle use.
3.1.1 Performance Measures: Enforce the ordinance between May and October, particularly at the 15 – 25 worst locations in Chicago, beginning in 2005. Publicize enforcement efforts with an annual press release, beginning in 2005. Post “No Parking in Bike Lane” signs at the 25 worst locations for double parking in 2006.
3.1.2 Best Practices: Transportation Alternatives, New York, NY, Give Respect, Get Respect campaign; San Francisco, CA; Chicago, IL
   
3.2 Increase enforcement at locations with a disproportionately high number of bicycle crashes and injuries. Targeting enforcement at locations with more bicycle crashes is an effective use of limited enforcement resources. Enforcement efforts should include the Lakefront Trail and popular bike lanes.
3.2.1 Performance Measure: Reduce the incidence of bicycle crashes and injuries at the top 15 – 25 crash locations by 5 percent annually, beginning in 2006.
3.2.2 Best Practices: Washington, D.C. Police Department, Safe Streets campaign; New York Police Department, NY, TrafficStat system
   
3.3 Develop and implement an enforcement program targeting motorist behaviors that are the greatest threats to bicyclist safety. Failure to yield is the most common type of motorist-bicyclist crash.2 Speeding significantly increases the severity of crashes. These behaviors discourage thousands of people from bicycling in Chicago. Increase the effectiveness of the targeted campaigns with innovative traffic law enforcement strategies including saturation patrols targeting a specific area, speed display, radar, and video cameras. Increase the effectiveness of traffic enforcement through media coverage, thereby broadcasting the bicycle safety message far beyond the direct impact of those stopped by police. Couple the enforcement with education, to increase its effectiveness (see Chapter 5: Education, Strategy 1.2.). Use cadets and other cost-effective staffing.
3.3.1 Performance Measures: Stage education and enforcement campaigns in 3 – 5 police districts per year, beginning in 2006. Increase to 5 – 10 police districts per year by 2010. Publicize beforehand to encourage voluntary compliance.
3.3.2 Best Practice: Wisconsin Department of Transportation State Patrol; Portland, OR
   
3.4 Develop and implement an enforcement program targeting particularly dangerous bicycling. Bicyclists often endanger themselves and others by disregarding traffic laws and trail user guidelines. Target dangerous behaviors, such as failure to stop at red lights, riding against traffic on busy streets, and excessive speeds on crowded multi-use trails. Warnings without fines can also help to change behavior. Increase the effectiveness of traffic enforcement through media coverage, thereby broadcasting the bicycle safety message far beyond the direct impact of those stopped by police. With enforcement, the possibility of receiving tickets spreads quickly by word of mouth. Without enforcement, many bicyclists perceive that the traffic laws do not apply to them and any behavior is acceptable. Couple the enforcement with education, including partnering with Bicycling Ambassadors, so that it is more effective (see Chapter 5: Education; Strategy 1.1.). Use cadets and other cost-effective staffing.
3.4.1 Performance Measures: Stage education and enforcement campaigns in 3 – 5 police districts per year, beginning in 2006. Increase to 5 – 10 police districts per year by 2010. Publicize beforehand to encourage voluntary compliance.
3.4.2 Best Practice: Toronto, ON, Cycle Right program

Possible Funding

Federal traffic safety (Section 402) funds; National Highway Traffic Safety Administration; National Center for Injury Prevention and Control; Chicago Police Department; Department of Revenue; Chicago Department of Transportation; Chicago Park District; grant funding from injury prevention and law enforcement foundations and organizations.

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